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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was elected pretty
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
the video. we have 2014 coming up. we hope to elect many more women to the congress. if we did not have so many women in congress up till now, we would not have the first woman speaker of the house and. thank you to emily's list for that. listening to the shiloh baptist church choir and taking our lead from them, when i saw the video and heard them tell me that to 16, and our own hopes for two fourteen -- you ain't seen nothing yet. thank you, emily's list, for having women lead the way, for helping to change the playing field. a promise you this. but with emily's list is held, if we reduce the role of money and politics, overturn the citizens united and the rest, and increase the level of civility in politics, we will change the environment in which politics is conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, emily's list. we are emily, and we ain't seen nothing yet. thank you all. [applause] >> a look at the jefferson memorial. president obama's public inauguration as tomorrow, which happens to be allocated. -- mlk day. [ind
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
party and here for an election celebration. he misspoke and said, you know, i am happy to be the president of the united states or something like that. jumping the gun a little bit. officials from south carolina and new hampshire. just want to mention that. who knows what the field will look like in a couple of years. a broad overview. not looking backwards but looking forward. giving the grand vision. perhaps, mentioning some of the issues he wants to tackle. gun control, deficit reduction. as you said, waiting on the big details until the state of the union address. neil: you mentioned finding common ground. we may have gotten a hint on that when republicans said they would look at eight debt ceiling it ascension back ago, probably, three months. what do you make of that? don: they would be blamed, roundly, thoroughly if the country went into some kind of default. the strategy, as you have been reporting, has been to try to take this issue off the table and then fight the battle over spending cuts when you have a sequestration cuts scheduled to start march 1. the curr
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
that dr. king talked about 50 years ago been fulfilled, would to re-election of president obama? >> i think you cannot deny that we have made tremendous progress and the election of -- re- election of president obama is another milestone moment in civil rights history, but we still have a long way to go as far as racial reconciliation in america, building what dr. king called the beloved community. tomorrow, yes, it is a milestone moment, not only for the president, but for america's quest for racial reconciliation. >> we have two experts. john mcconnell worked with george bush on his inaugural address. terry edmonds spent eight years working with bill clinton. we talked about the reference to dr. king. your former boss making reference to abraham lincoln in his second inaugural address. >> we will get that ready in just a moment. let's go to the phones. curtis from akron, ohio. >> thank you for taking my call. it is a pleasure to be on the air. i had the privilege, when i was 20 years old, i was on the executive board of kent state democrats. me and some of the members of the executi
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, where americans were held for over 400 days after a group of islamic militants and students took over the embassy. as he was giving his inauguration address, the militants were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> raise your right hand and repeat after me. i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. t
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
won the election. thak a look at the poll numbers, a new cnn/"time" magazine/orc poll, shows the president's approval rating is 55%, 43% disapprove of the way he's doing his job. breakdown, 92% of democrats say they approve. 13% of republicans say the president is doing a good job. >> just 13% of republicans say the president is doing a good job. so how does he begin to bridge that gap? clark judge is with us right now. he's a speech writer who worked in the reagan white house, he's the founder and managing director of the white house writers group. so clark, you think the president needs to do something to reach across the aisle. to talk about the common themes that unite us. how do you do that? >> a good model for him would be bill clinton's inaugural address, or ronald reagan's second inaugural. both of those were similar kinds of political environments. congress was in the hands of the other party. or one house was, at least. and each of them was very gracious towards the other party. reached out, said things about the goodwill of the other party. >> the difference there
my own take on it. i have my own system to predicting elections. it's called the dees the white house. and it's how well think party holding the white house has governed, whether or not the sitting president is running again. so if barack obama wants to extend -- which is very difficult, have three democratic presidents in a row, it is all going to depend on his success in governing and leading the country. if he is success, and comes out as a very popular president who has achieved something, then there's an excellent chance that the democrats are capture another term in the white house. if he doesn't. if he leaves as a failed president like george w. bush, then we'll get a change in party power in 2016 and this is true regardless of the identity of the democratic nominee. i think barack obama would very much like to be one of those rare presidents who passes on his success to another candidate of his own party. that doesn't happen very often. it happened with reagan and bush, and before that you have to go back to roosevelt and truman. >> michael: yeah,
elected the past four years and 30% say more bipartisan and 15% were unsure exactly why we were calling them. >> and by the way his approval rating was right where george w. bush's was starting hicks second turn and below bill clinton, and 51%. and he said i'm going to close gitmo, that did not work out his way and almost everybody said it would be impossible to close because we've got a problem, we have nowhere to put those people. >> he said he'd close it in the first year. >> the first thing he signed. >> absolutely. the left plank after he didn't do it the first year, he'll do it the second year and the third year and the fourth year. >> harder when he's a candidate to an achieve. the economy, they said if they passed the massive unemployment, it'd keep under 8%, it was spiked up to 10% and down to 7.8 and they say it's a fail. and killed osama bin laden, and passed health care, what kind of program we'll be we're only getting it now, it passed two years ago. >> alisyn: and iraq, promised to end iraq and making steps towards that as well. >> iraq and afghanistan. >> although unemplo
risks. the congressional clock is still going according to the next election. >> reporter: but he can't push too hard. former reagan chief of staff says after a second win, most presidents have an inflated view of their power. >> so you have to figure out ways you can accomplish things and go directionally in the way you're going. realizing that time is an enemy. get as much done as you can, but don't overreach. >> reporter: a lesson president obama promises he learned. >> i'm more than familiar with all the literature about presidential overreach in second terms. we are very cautious about that. >> reporter: at the same time, he has to battle white house fatigue. >> people get tired. staffers leave. and you lose some institutional memory. >> reporter: above all, avoid scandal. what is known as the second term curse. something quite a few modern day presidents have fallen victim to. >> i am not a crook. >> reporter: for richard nixon, it was watergate. he resigned over the break in and cover up just 18 months after his re-election. >> i did not have sexual relations with that woman. m
four, five years ago the president of the us u then senator, promised if elected, by the end of my first term, i'm going to cut that first deficit in half. we didn't hear anything about that yesterday. in fact, it sounded more like spend, spend, spend, and in fact, if you're just waking up, you were sleeping through the speech yesterday, the main speech point was whatever you need, middle class, we're going to give it to you. >> brian: education, roads, communication, networks, science, labs, a lot of investment in infrastructure, which means investment infrastructure means do you need revenue? to get revenue, you raise taxes. >> gretchen: you lint like what he was talking about, maybe you liked that it was short. under 20 minutes. we heard that one president in history gave a two-hour speech. >> brian: and he died. >> steve: he did. >> gretchen: he did soon after of pneumonia. let's talk about that whole idea of the middle class, though, because these are the facts, folks. the median household income in 2007 was $54,489. of course, that was before the banks collapsed and before th
reminds me when i read that of the comment during the last election from then senator now president obama about people clinging to their guns. and bill clinton saying politically you need to be careful with this. >> bill clinton grew up in arkansas and knows this kind of stuff in his bones. he knows the danger that it can present to the democratic party. they have lost mid terms in the past because of the gun issue. al gore, clinton talked specifically about al gore taking an unpopular side of a gun issue in colorado, lost colorado and lost the presidency. also democrats are concerned about this issue for 2014. in the senate you have red state democrats up for reelection in alaska and arkansas and montana, in south dakota. and in laz. a bunch of red states and they are very worried about taking positions that will lose the seats. >> take a look at a couple of polls because the numbers are interesting. this one says in the debate on guns which is more important to protect they asked the people that were polled. 51% said the constitutional right to own a gun and 40% said citizens to be prot
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)